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Food & Yard Waste

Indoor Composting

​Apartments, condos or homes with little or no yards can also take advantage of composting through vermicomposting or other alternatives.

Vermicomposting
Vermicomposting is an indoor compost bin that uses worms to break down material. Vermicompost bins take up little space and, if maintained, do not create bad smells.

Buy or build a bin
Vermicompost bins are harder to find in stores than backyard composters. If the local garden or home improvement store does not carry vermicompost bins, order one online by searching “vermicompost bin.”

Large online distributors include:


NOTE: Dakota County lists these products for informational purposes only and does not endorse any product.

You can also make a vermicompost bin out of wood nailed together or plastic bins. Simple instructions are available from:


Where to get worms

The best species of worms for vermicomposting is Eisenia foetida also called red wigglers. Ask your local garden center if they sell red wigglers or purchase them online at sites such as:


NOTE: Dakota County lists these products for informational purposes only and does not endorse any product.

What goes in vermicomposting
Add materials once or twice a week. Cover food waste with newspaper or other dry materials to avoid bugs and smells. The materials you can use are listed at Rethink Recycling.

Maintenance, care and troubleshooting
When properly and regularly maintained, vermicomposting has very few problems. There are many good books available at local libraries on this subject. There are also several good resources on the Internet to help get the worm bin up and running:


Alternatives to vermicomposting

If composting using worms does not sound appealing, other indoor food waste methods are available. The Bokashi Composter uses a fermentation method to break down food rather than the conventional composting.  The Nature Mill Composter plugs into a standard electrical outlet to heat the food scraps and provide a mechanical stirrer to aerate the compost. Both methods provide finished compost in as little as two weeks. 

NOTE: Dakota County lists these products for informational purposes only and does not endorse any product.

Resources

Last updated: 3/4/2014 9:37 AM